What Is Coursera Certificate?

What Is Coursera Certificate?

What’s a Coursera Certificate? What’s it Worth? Coursera answers If you aren’t aware, Coursera is one of the top providers of Massive Open Online Courses known as MOOCS, together with Udacity and edX. MOOCs area system for Universities to put their whole curriculum for a given course including texts, lecturers, problem sets and more online for any person to study, utilizing video and web based testing. Most have termed MOOCs a revolution in education, and with many students enrolling majority from Brazil, India and other low income countries it is certain that they’re here to stay. There are three significant obstacles for MOOC providers. First, the obvious one, how do they make cash on these free programs? Second, perhaps equally significant, how can they permit students to demonstrate the knowledge that they have acquired, when there is no certified diploma? Finally, how can they control cheating in a technology world where stealing answers is as simple as opening a fresh instant message window? Coursera plans to assist solve these challenges with their new accreditation program, called Signature Track. How does it function? So let’s imagine you enroll in a free Coursera program. After you enroll and the course has begun, you have approximately three weeks to decide that you seek to be in the”Signature Track”, which gives proof of course finishing as well as a grade showing how well you scored. If you decide that you seek to go with the Signature Track choice, you have to conduct a few steps. Pay between thirty to a hundred dollars depending on the course. Send a recognized ID for example your drivers license and take a picture of yourself through webcam. This offers Coursera a way to confirm that you are who you claim you are. Write a short writing sample, which permits them to utilize your “keystroke” signature as a finger print of sorts. They require you to repeat this typing sample after each examination so they can be somehow sure it was you who did the examination. After these procedures, you continue taking your curriculum, taking examinations and acquiring grades. Once you’ve finished the course and possess your grades, you can then send your detailed course score with employers through a web based interface. Currently only five courses operate on Signature Track, however Coursera seeks to upgrade most of their 200 plus courses by the end of the year. What’s a Coursera Certification Worth? This is a little more complicated. Ultimately, students enroll in courses to acquire knowledge that will assist them get ahead- acquire a better job or a promotion. To be crude, to get more cash. That’s why college has often provided among the top returns on investment of close to anything anyone can purchase. You spend money to acquire a degree, then you utilize that degree to get more cash since it’s proven that a bachelors certification has a net present value of approximately $450,000. With that...

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Internet History, Technology, and Security – Final Exam

Internet History, Technology, and Security – Final Exam

Welcome to the final exam. There are 40 questions on the exam. Once you start the exam, you will have 24 hours to finish the exam. You can only take the exam once. Remember to always select the *best* answer. What was the primary reason the Colossus computer was faster than the BOMBE computer? Your AnswerFlagScoreExplantion The Colossus added cache memory to speed up instruction fetch 0.00 The Colossus computer sharded its databases across multiple servers to improve throughput 0.00 The Colossus computer submerged its bearings in oil to allow it to spin four times faster 0.00 The Colossus computer used Flash RAM rather than spinning disk drives 0.00 The Colossus computer used vacuum tubes instead or gears and relays Correct 1.00 Click here to learn more Your AnswerFlagScoreExplantion A cell phone antenna 0.00 A postcard Correct 1.00 A restaurant 0.00 A three-ring binder 0.00 The intersection of two roads 0.00 Click here to learn more Your AnswerFlagScoreExplantion To allow universities to switch to IP telephony to save per-office charges 0.00 To connect scientists to supercomputers Correct 1.00 To increase the demand for telephone company services 0.00 To increase the speed of E-Mail between universities 0.00 To provide a communications infrastructure for the World-Wide-Web 0.00 Given the original five-year and 15 million dollar budget of the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNet), what was the expected speed of the national NSFNet backbone? Your AnswerFlagScoreExplantion 1 billion bits per second 0.00 1.5 million bits per second 0.00 3 billion bits per second 0.00 45 million bits per second 0.00 56 thousand bits per second Correct 1.00 Which of the following is the best explanation as to why the web was invented at CERN? Your AnswerFlagScoreExplantion At a 1985 IETF meeting in Columbus, Ohio the delegates agreed that CERN should invent the web 0.00 Being in Switzerland ensured that the project managers paid very close attention to detail 0.00 CERN was in possession of all of the top-secret communications equipment from Bletchley Park 0.00 The French government passed a law that all documents needed to be online by 1993 0.00 Well-funded smart people in a culture that was open and fun Correct 1.00 What protocol was commonly used during 1990-1993 to organize and find information on the Internet that did not use the world-wide-web protocols? Your AnswerFlagScoreExplantion Altavista 0.00 Gopher Correct 1.00 RTSP 0.00 Wikipedia 0.00 Yahoo! 0.00 Where was the first web server in America in production on December 12, 1991? Your AnswerFlagScoreExplantion Harvard University 0.00 National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at University of Illinois 0.00 Princeton University 0.00 Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Correct 1.00 University of Michigan 0.00 Which of the following is something that Robert Cailliau and Tim...

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Model Thinking – Quiz 10: Sections 19-20

Model Thinking – Quiz 10: Sections 19-20

Section 19 deals with Replicator Dynamics. Be ready to answer both conceptual and mathematical questions on this topic, as well as questions about Fisher’s Fundamental Theorem. Section 20 is all about crowd wisdom and predictions. Questions 6 through 9 deal with the specifics of the Diversity Prediction Theorem, so make sure you have a good grasp of that. And then there’s a fun one about predictive models at the end. Good luck, and enjoy! Which of the following are fundamental components of Fisher's Fundamental Theorem? You can pick more than one. Your Answer Flag Score Explantion Cooperation Games Correct 0.17 Markov Processes Correct 0.17 Prisoner’s Dilemma Correct 0.17 Replicator Dynamics Correct 0.17 Rugged Landscapes Correct 0.17 There is no cardinal Correct 0.17 There are three predictions: 45, 25, 56. The actual value is 39. What is the average diversity? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion 145.32 0.00 164.67 Correct 1.00 289 0.00 42 0.00 In a job interview, you are asked to predict the number of ping pong balls that can fit into a yellow school bus. Which type of predictive model are you better off using? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion Categorical Model 0.00 Linear Model Correct 1.00 What are the two mechanisms by which replication occurs in the Replicator Dynamics model? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion 1. Agents always have an incentive to defect; 2. Agents do what has the best payoff. 0.00 1. Agents do what a lot of other agents are doing; 2. Agents do what has the best payoff. Correct 1.00 1. Agents have some baseline tolerance for difference; 2. Agents move to accommodate this tolerance. 0.00 1. Agents retain some internal consistency; 2. Agents do what has the best payoff. 0.00 Question Explanation Remember, agents replicate according to the strategy that seems to have the best payoff and that many of the other agents are using. [See 19.2, “Replicator Equation”] In which situation would you choose Six Sigma (the importance of reducing variation) over Fisher's Fundamental Theory (which encourages variance)? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion When the landscape is dancing. Correct 0.25 When the landscape is rugged but you have not yet found a global maximum. Correct 0.25 When trying to cure cancer. Correct 0.25 When you have found a global optima in either a single peaked landscape or a fixed but rugged landscape. Correct 0.25 Question Explanation Remember, variance in Fisher’s Fundamental Theorem is helpful for finding solutions that are otherwise difficult to find either because there are many local optima or because the landscape is changing and requires adaptation (like curing cancer). Problems which are fixed landscapes and for which the best solution has largely been found, are better handled by trying...

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New Models of Business in Society – Week 2 Quiz

New Models of Business in Society – Week 2 Quiz

          Today’s model of corporate philanthropy can be traced back to Andrew Carnegie’s Two Principles of Wealth and the tradition of noblesse oblige. Your Answer Flag Score Explantion False 0.00 True Correct 1.00 Click here to learn more Your Answer Flag Score Explantion False Incorrect 0.00 True Correct 1.00 What are the Four Shades of Green? (Check all that apply) Your Answer Flag Score Explantion Customer Green Correct 0.17 Dark Green Correct 0.17 Legal Green Correct 0.17 Lime Green Correct 0.17 Money Green Correct 0.17 Stakeholder Green Correct 0.17 There are still many challenges with the environmentalism movement, so it is important to take personal responsibility and not completely rely on others to make changes happen. Your Answer Flag Score Explantion False Incorrect 0.00 True Correct...

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New Models of Business in Society – Week 1 Quiz

New Models of Business in Society – Week 1 Quiz

        Which of the following are included in the Six Key Assumptions about the Dominant Story of Business? (check all that apply) Your Answer Flag Score Explantion All business people wear business suits. Correct 0.25 Capitalism works because humans are completely self-interested and will only act for others if given proper incentives. Correct 0.25 The only constituency that matters is shareholders. Correct 0.25 We live in a world of limitless physical resources, so we don’t need to pay attention to our impact on the environment. Correct 0.25 Which one of the following is NOT one of the Four Flaws of the Standard Story of business? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion Business ethics is an oxymoron (a figure of speech that combines contradictory terms), e.g. jumbo shrimp. Correct 0.25 Business is just about economics and making money. Correct 0.25 Capitalism is an outdated economic system. Correct 0.25 People are just motivated by money. Correct 0.25 Radical advances in information technology are driving much of the change in the business world. Your Answer Flag Score Explantion False Incorrect 0.00 True Correct 1.00 The Global Financial Crisis had no effect on the public's trust in banks and big business. Your Answer Flag Score Explantion False Correct 1.00 True 0.00 The following are included in the Five Principles that support the New Story of Business: (check all that apply) Your Answer Flag Score Explantion All business transactions need to be done on Fridays. Correct 0.25 Building and leading a business involves getting the interests of all the stakeholders going in the same direction. Correct 0.25 Business is primarily about purpose – money and profits follow Correct 0.25 Most people have moral values and act responsibly most of the time – that behavior needs to be expected. Correct...

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Exploring Quantum Physics – Homework 1 Bonus Questions (Ungraded)

Exploring Quantum Physics – Homework 1 Bonus Questions (Ungraded)

        Which is the position operator in momentum space? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion $$\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = e^{i x p} \frac{\hbar}{p} \psi(p)$$ 0.00 $$\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = i \hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial p} \psi(p)$$ 0.00 $$\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = x \psi(p)$$ 0.00 $$\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = \frac{ip}{m} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \right)^{-1} \psi(p)$$ 0.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = e^{i x p} \frac{\hbar}{p} \psi(p)⟨p|x^|ψ⟩=eixpℏpψ(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = e^{i x p} \frac{\hbar}{p} \psi(p) 0.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = e^{i x p} \frac{\hbar}{p} \psi(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = e^{i x p} \frac{\hbar}{p} \psi(p) 0.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = i \hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial p} \psi(p)⟨p|x^|ψ⟩=iℏ∂∂pψ(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = i \hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial p} \psi(p) 0.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = i \hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial p} \psi(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = i \hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial p} \psi(p) Correct 1.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = x \psi(p)⟨p|x^|ψ⟩=xψ(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = x \psi(p) 0.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = x \psi(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = x \psi(p) Incorrect 0.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = \frac{ip}{m} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \right)^{-1} \psi(p)⟨p|x^|ψ⟩=ipm(∂∂t)−1ψ(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = \frac{ip}{m} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \right)^{-1} \psi(p) Incorrect 0.00 \langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = \frac{ip}{m} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \right)^{-1} \psi(p)\langle p | \hat x | \psi \rangle = \frac{ip}{m} \left( \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \right)^{-1} \psi(p)...

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Exploring Quantum Physics – Homework 1

Exploring Quantum Physics – Homework 1

      For what was Albert Einstein awarded the Nobel prize? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion Blackbody Radiation 0.00 Electron diffraction 0.00 General Relativity 0.00 Special Relativity Incorrect 0.00 The Big Bang theory 0.00 The expansion of the universe Incorrect 0.00 The photo-electric effect Correct 1.00 Recall how the Schrödinger equation was motivated by the non-relativistic dispersion relation $$E= rac{p^2}{2m}$$. If we follow the same procedure for the case of a relativistic dispersion relation ($$E^2=p^2c^2 m^2 c^4$$), what equation do we arrive at?</p> <p>(For simplicity consider the one-dimensional case) Your Answer Flag Score Explantion $$(i\hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \hbar^2\frac{\partial^2}{\partial x^2} m^2 c^4) \phi=0$$ 0.00 $$(\hbar \frac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2} D\frac{\partial^2}{\partial x^2})\phi=0$$ 0.00 $$\left(\frac{1}{c^2}\frac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2} – \frac{\partial^2}{\partial x^2} \frac{m^2 c^2}{\hbar^2}\right) \phi =0$$ Correct 1.00 $$\left(\frac{1}{c^2}\frac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2} – \frac{\partial^2}{\partial x^2}\right)\phi=0$$ 0.00 ”The $$, the born rule then places a constraint on the modulus of $$A$$. Assuming that $$A$$ is real and positive, what is the value of $$A$$?”] Your Answer Flag Score Explantion $$\frac{1}{2d}$$ 0.00 $$\frac{1}{4d}$$ Incorrect 0.00 $$\frac{1}{d}$$ 0.00 $$\frac{1}{\sqrt{2d}}$$ Correct 1.00 $$\frac{1}{\sqrt{4d}}$$ 0.00 What is the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a particle in a potential $$V= rac{1}{2} m omega^2 x^2$$? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion $$i \hbar \frac{\partial \psi}{\partial t} = -\frac{\hbar^2 \nabla^2}{2m}\psi \frac{1}{2}m \omega^2 x^2 \psi$$ 0.00 $$i \hbar \frac{\partial \psi}{\partial t} = -\frac{\hbar^2 \nabla^2}{2m}\psi \frac{1}{2}m \omega^2 x^2$$ Incorrect 0.00 $$i \hbar \frac{\partial \psi}{\partial t} = \frac{1}{2}m \omega^2 x^2 $$ 0.00 $$i \hbar \frac{\partial \psi}{\partial t} = \frac{1}{2}m \omega^2 x^2 \psi$$ 0.00 $$\left(i\hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \frac{1}{2}m \omega^2 x^2\right)\psi = -\frac{\hbar^2 \nabla^2}{2m} \psi$$ Incorrect 0.00 $$\left(i\hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial t} \frac{1}{2}m \omega^2 x^2\right)\psi = E\psi$$ 0.00 ”Suppose $$? Please provide your answer in terms of $$A$$, $$d$$, mathematical constants such as $$\pi$$ (entered as pi) or $$e$$ (entered as e). (Assume that A is real)”] Your Answer Flag Score Explantion ”What $$”] Your Answer Flag Score Explantion $$1$$ 0.00 $$p$$ 0.00 $$\frac{E}{m}$$ Incorrect 0.00 $$\frac{p}{E}$$ 0.00 $$\frac{p}{m}$$ Correct 1.00 Suppose a particle has wavefunction $$psi(x,t=0) = Aexpleft(- rac{x^2}{2l^2} ight)$$. What is the average value (expectation value) of $$hat p$$, $$langle hat p angle$$, for this state at $$t=0$$? Your Answer Flag Score Explantion </p> <p>The variance $$sigma^2_X = langle (hat X- langle hat X angle)^2 angle$$ of an operator, $$hat X$$, is a measure of how large a range its possible values are spread over (the standard deviation is given by $$sigma = sqrt{sigma^2}$$). Suppose that $$|X angle$$ is an eigenstate of some operator $$hat X$$, what is the variance of $$hat X$$ in this state? <b>You may assume that $$|X angle$$ is normalized ($$langle X|X angle=1$$).</b></p> <p><i>Note that the expectation value of an operator in the state</i> $$|psi angle$$<i> is given by $$langle hat O angle equiv langle psi| hat O |psi angle$$. </i></p> <p>...

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